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Brexit - The Urgent Need To Be Prepared

Brexit – It’s All Customary

It seems so long ago that one of the largest looming threats to Irish business life was the notion of Brexit and the atmosphere of uncertainty that surrounded not knowing what form Brexit was to take. Obviously with the current Covid-19 emergency there are much bigger threats to Irish businesses, but Brexit remains a very real issue that we need to be aware of.

If your business trades directly with the United Kingdom, there will obviously be some changes to your daily business life which it is important to prepare for. From January 1st, 2021, all goods imported into Ireland from Great Britain will be subject customs processes.

As we have discussed previously, one of the most vital ways to prepare for these changes is to register for an Economic Operator Registration Identification (EORI) number, we recommend completing this step ASAP if you have not done it already. This can be done through Revenue’s MyAccount online system.

Once you have your company’s EORI number you must then decide if all customs work will be completed in-house if you feel competent to do so, and have the required software and access to Revenue’s customs systems. If you are not comfortable with completing customs work yourself, you can engage a customs agent to work on your behalf.

We hope that this information has been of use to you and your business, and as always would like you to know that we are here for you and your company at any time should you have any queries.

The SME Credit Guarantee Scheme

The SME Credit Guarantee Scheme

We have discussed Covid-19 business supports at length since the onset of this global emergency, while also discussing the vital nature of the SME area in Ireland. SMEs make up a huge portion of Irish businesses, and whilst last years looming Brexit panic may have seemed like an enormous threat to their business activities, this year has proven the ultimate challenge. With this in mind today we will be discussing another area of assistance for these types of businesses both in the wake of Covid and in the realm of what the new normal will look like.

The SME Credit Guarantee Scheme is intended to encourage additional lending to SMEs, something we can all agree is absolutely essential. This scheme offers a partial Government guarantee of 80% to banks against losses, essentially placing the Government as a guarantor against the SME’s loan. The scheme is aimed at SMEs facing difficulty in accessing traditional lending and is operated on behalf of the Strategic Banking Corporation of Ireland (SCBI) and is accessible from lenders such as AIB, Bank of Ireland and Ulster Bank. These loans are available to fund working capital, refinancing current Covid19 funding and also in order to invest in your business so it can adapt to the current emergency.

Loans range from €10,000 to €1million and can have a term of up to 7 years. A guaranteed premium will apply to be paid directly to the Government. The scheme is available until December 2020. We recommend checking in with your local banking branch for further information and eligibility requirements.

As always, we here at Ecovis DCA are available should you have any concerns or queries on any business or financial matters.

For more information visit Enterprise.gov.ie

The Phased Payment Plan

The Phased Payment Plan – (PPA)

We have dedicated ourselves over the past couple of months to sharing important information with our clients and friends, information which could assist in keeping businesses alive and kicking during such a difficult time, as our country begins to play hopscotch between the levels within the Living with Covid Plan.

As we discussed in recent weeks, a number of extensions have been granted which may assist businesses in filing on time, despite the ongoing challenges posed by the Coronavirus Emergency. It was announced recently that companies would be given more time to pay any outstanding tax bills to Revenue using a payment plan at a discounted rate of interest and would have until the end of September to agree.

Previously the July stimulus package allowed the warehousing of Covid tax debts until a period of reopening, as well as offering a level of amnesty on non-Covid tax debts. This saw a phased payment plan (PPA) enacted by Revenue wherein companies could repay their outstanding dates at a 3% interest rate over a phased plan. The deadline for putting this arrangement in place has now been extended to the end of October, which may allow for many other companies to avail of this plan.

Revenue themselves issued a statement stating that the extension was due to the challenges faced by taxpayers and tax agents during this time, while Collector General Joe Howley state that:

“The 3% interest rate available to taxpayers under this measure is a significant reduction from standard interest rates of 8% to 10% per annum that normally apply to late payments of tax. I strongly encourage the uptake of this opportunity and of the extended deadline that now applies”.

Another bonus to partaking in this PPA is that your company may qualify for tax clearance as a result of utilising this plan of debt payment.

Visit the Revenue site for more information on this and other matters, including a comprehensive booklet here Revenue information booklet .

We hope that this information is of use to you, and as always, we are fully available should you have any queries or concerns on any business and financial matters.

Research and Development (R&D) Credit: Appointment of expert to assist in audits

Revenue have recently released a manual setting out the Revenue procedure for appointing and briefing an independent expert to assist in evaluating the science test in R&D tax credit audits.

By way of background, each year, Revenue’s Incentives unit places an advertisement on the public procurement website, www.etenders.gov.ie1 , inviting applications for placement on a panel of experts to advise in relation to claims for tax credits in respect of incremental expenditure incurred wholly and exclusively on R&D.

Applications for membership of the panel will be accepted at any time during the year. In order, to be eligible to apply for a place on the panel, individuals must hold a relevant PhD or experiential equivalent. Where an independent expert is required in a field that is not represented on the panel formed from the above process, the Incentives unit will identify suitable experts and approach them with a view to their joining the panel.

The appropriate timing for appointing an independent expert will vary from case to case. In some cases, it will be necessary to appoint an independent expert at the outset of a review while in others one may only be required where Revenue and the company reach an impasse in relation to an aspect of the science test.

Independent experts should not be engaged to explain the science: they should only be engaged where there is a doubt that the science test has been met.

Full details of the manual and procedure can be found here

 

 

5 Tips for leading your company out of a crisis

Getting out of a crisis is difficult and requires extraordinary measures and great efforts from a company and its people. Since we’re here to help, we’ve listed 5 tips for leading your company out of a crisis or turnaround situation. Read on and make smart use of these tips.

1. Identify (and solve) the problem

The first step to overcoming a crisis is to identify the main problem that caused it. You can’t deal with a crisis until you determine its core issues. It can be caused by internal factors such as poor financial assistance by management accountants or external factors such as natural disasters like the COVID-19 pandemic. To solve the causes of underlying problems, you should analyze the common signs of distress listed below.

Distress signals

  • Declining or negative cash flow;
  • Declining stock price;
  • Regulatory inquiries;
  • Large or unplanned workforce reductions;
  • Increase in outstanding accounts payable;
  • Resignations of key finance staff;
  • Management turnover;
  • Shrinking EBITDA (Earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization) margin.

2. Find (and retain) talented people

One of the few good sides of a crisis is that the opportunity arises to find the next level of talent in an organization. As a turnaround manager, you should look beyond the leadership team for people with institutional knowledge. They know all the ins and outs of the company and are essential to realizing the impact of potential changes on the business. Be aware though, in many cases, they are the dissatisfied ones, unhappy with the company’s performance. But because of this, they are willing to point out the painful truths – and that’s just what needs to be done on the road to leading a company out of a crisis.

You should also keep an eye out for people that want to add value and impact. In most cases, you won’t find these people sitting around the table at the beginning, but two or three levels down – waiting for an opportunity to be part of something greater than themselves. Retaining these people isn’t always about money and bonuses: it’s about figuring out their individual needs and get them involved.

3. Approaching financial experts

A crisis is usually not the result of a single decision but an accumulation of multiple unsound decisions. Trying to deal with it by yourself and not asking for help can be an unsound decision. Financial advisors are adept at solving cash flow issues that are stifling the growth of an organization. Their strategies can be useful in a crisis scenario that requires you to make hard choices as well. Getting help from experts such as chartered accountants and business support advisors can lead your company out of a crisis.

4. Concentrate on cash

In general, the board and management of most companies focus on complex, long-term metrics like EBIT and turnover. There’s nothing wrong with that, but unpleasant surprises are waiting when no one is concentrating on cash, especially during a crisis. So, the opposite needs to be done to keep a company financially healthy. The best way of doing this is by finding out which investments are making or burning cash, and by subsequently bringing your business back to its fundamental element of success.

Monitoring your cash flow will help you understand your company’s income and expenses. Every asset the company owns, from investments, physical assets to services rendered should be numbered and assessed for monetary value. When going through a crisis, it is critical to make sure employee salaries, credit payments and invoice payments can be met. You should also consider loans to ease through the current deficit. But make sure to not burden yourself further since banks and other financial institutions charge high interest on loans.

5. Dare to criticise your own business plan

The best thing you can do to avoid distress is to periodically review your business plans and see how the company scores on operational and market performance. Find out where you stand as a company using essential financial and cash flow milestones, and do the same concerning your business and competitors. If that shows that you’re not moving with – or outpacing – the rest of the industry, then your business plan may be out-of-date.

Conclusion

According to recent reports, the corporate crisis has increased in Ireland due to the recent COVID-19 pandemic. Getting out of a crisis may take some time and effort since it can’t be controlled instantly. At last, don’t forget to analyze your past mistakes, get help from experts like business advisors and accountants, make an effective strategic plan and manage your company’s finances. By following the steps mentioned above, you will be able to recover and overcome the ongoing crisis.

Limiting the Impact of Cybercrime

This new crisis of Covid-19 presents a number of unforeseen challenges to companies, with many needing to create a new standard for working remotely, or where this is not possible the requirement becomes to seek funding, reduce employee numbers/hours or close temporarily.

One of the more unexpected challenges of this time is the resurgence of cybercrime. Cyber criminals tend to utilize major news events as an opportunity to mount a criminal campaign and the Covid-19 crisis is no different. This campaign can take many forms. One of the most common at present being the false emails issued regarding a change of banking details, luring the receiver into issuing payments to the wrong account at what is already a deeply difficult time for companies.

Des Ryan, solutions director for Microsoft Ireland has explained this new resurgence is an attack of opportunity as cyber criminals tend to prey on events which may weaken the defences of a business, in this case the shift to remote working situations.

“Cyber criminals are opportunistic […] we are definitely seeing Covid-19 related attacks as attackers are just using this to find the weak link.”

It is also suggested that cyber criminals are merely adapting their usual tactics to profit from the current crisis. The current breed of cyber criminals is known for sending false emails detailing a change of bank details or requesting a change to Revolut (which would ensure that the funds are transferred with immediate effect). There have also been a number of fake charity accounts set up purporting to benefit the current Covid-19 crisis. These criminals are preying on companies who may not have been prepared to work remotely and have had to set up a temporary system quickly and without training and protection in place and targeting staff members who are now outside of their comfort zone and possibly distracted with their surroundings. Utilising personal laptops and phones etc. may also be a point of weakness as these will not be as secure as those in the workplace.

Many are already feeling the strain of this current atmosphere of anxiety and so it seems We are all protecting our staff health during this time, but how can we protect the digital health of our business at what is already an intense time?

  • Consider setting staff up with work laptops and phones where necessary. This will ensure that the devices are as protected for home use as they are within the office environment. Having equipment to hand that requires multi-step authentication will provide extra security.
  • Where possible, if a work laptop is not issued, staff should try to ensure that the computer is used only for their work during this time if they deal with sensitive information.
  • Online security training may be a good way for staff to utilize this possibly quieter time to upskill.
  • Remember and remind your staff of the basics of verifying the origin of an email or phonecall before dealing with any bank details. Often, false emails can be incredibly convincing until you hover over the email address and notice that it isn’t correct.
  • Ensure that all staff are aware of these targeted campaigns and are extra vigilant when dealing with any bank details or personal details.

We hope that this information will be of benefit to you and your company and that you and your staff are staying healthy and well in these difficult times. We are as always available should you require any advice or guidance on any business of financial matters.

Euro Currency

Alternative Lending

Flender

Flender Ireland  is a Peer to Peer Lender for small and medium sized business. It is authorised by the UK Financial Conduct Authority. Flender offer the  following products:

 

Term Loans

Flender offers businesses access to fast funding up to €300,000. Get a credit decision within 6 hours and receive funds within 24 hours. Terms range from 6 to 36 months, with rates starting as low as 6.45%.

In order to apply for a term loan companies / sole traders need:

  • Completed Application form
  • Last 2 years Filed Accounts – Unabridged version with P & L and Balance Sheet
  • Last 2 years Revenue Filed Form 11s (if sole trader)
  • Up to date Management accounts if available
  • Last 6 months bank statements
  • Up to date tax cert – (Tax Ref Number & Access Number ID)

Applications are made on line at : https://www.flender.ie/users/registration/borrower

 

Merchant Cash Advance

Online merchants and other businesses that conduct a majority of their sales online are prime candidates for our MCA product. Since businesses of this nature receive payment primarily via credit card purchases, the monthly payment amount is less when a business is making less revenue and increases when the business makes more revenue. If you earn revenue via check or cash, an MCA probably isn’t right for you.

 

  • Works with natural trade cycles – ideal for retail, hospitality and service businesses
  • Repayments made daily as a small percentage of card terminal revenues
  • Lump sum funding from €10,000 to €250,000
  • Terms from 3 to 12 months
  • Repayments made directly through merchant card processors

 

For further information please contact:

Ecovis DCA

Stephen Connolly – Stephen.connolly@ecovis.ie

Dennis Duffy  – dennis.duffy@ecovis.ie

 

Flender

Colin Canny  – colin.canny@flender.ie

 

Linked Finance

Covid 19 Emergency Loan Product

Linked Finance has launched a Deferred Start Loan for businesses affected by the Covid-19 pandemic. It means businesses can get access to working capital now, with the reassurance of no repayments for the first 3 months.

After the first 3 months payment-free, the loan is then repaid over a 12 month period.

Loans are available up to €100,000 to businesses that are trading for at least 2 years and have a (pre-crisis) annual turnover in excess of €100,000. As with their standard loans, the application process is very simple, just three standard documents, no projections and a credit decision will be given in 24 hours

Any established and creditworthy business, whether it is a limited company, sole trader or business partnership, can apply for a loan on Linked Finance.

In order to apply for this facility companies / sole traders will need:

  • Last 6 full calendar months bank statements i.e. Sept 1st to Feb 29th.
  • Proof of overdraft (IF ANY) Even online screen-print is fine
  • Latest full set of accounts to include Admin Expenses breakdown

Some conditions apply. These include:

  • If you are a sole trader, you must be a permanent resident of Ireland.
  • If your business is a partnership, it must have a permanent place of business in Ireland and at least half of its partners must be permanent residents of Ireland.
  • If your business is a limited company, it must be registered with the Companies Registration Office (CRO).
  • It must have filed accounts with the CRO (if required to do so) at least once and at least half of its directors must be Irish residents.
  • Your business must have been actively trading for at least the past two years.
  • Your business must meet our minimum credit risk and fraud criteria.
  • Your business must not have any outstanding judgements for more than €250.
  • In special circumstances, we can support younger companies who have demonstrated strong growth potential over a shorter trading history but this is at Linked Finance’s sole discretion.

For further information please contact

Ecovis DCA

Stephen Connolly – Stephen.connolly@ecovis.ie

Dennis Duffy  – dennis.duffy@ecovis.ie

Linked Finance

Mark Lindsey – mark@linkedfinance.com

Covid 19 – Update on Social Welfare supports for Employees and Employers

  • Social Welfare measures for Employees & the Self Employed
  • Process for Employers for keeping staff on the Payroll
  • The process for Refunds to Employers who engage with the scheme

COVID 19 – Pandemic Unemployment Payment

If you have lost work due to a downturn in economic activity caused by COVID-19 you can apply for the new  COVID 19 – Pandemic Unemployment Payment at this link – https://www.gov.ie/en/service/be74d3-covid-19-pandemic-unemployment-payment/

This new payment quickly delivers income support to the unemployed (be they self-employed or employees) for a 6-week period.

It is designed to provide income security for a period during which you can apply for a full Jobseekers payment (and receive any additional entitlements backdated).

You can apply for the Pandemic Unemployment Payment by filling in a one page application at the link above and returning to PO BOX 12896, Dublin 1. by FREEPOST. You do not need to visit an Intreo Centre to apply.

 

How to Qualify

Both employees and self-employed people can apply for the new COVID-19 Pandemic Unemployment Payment.

You can apply for the payment if you:

  • Are aged between 18 and 66 years AND
  • You have lost employment due to the COVID-19 (Coronavirus) pandemic
  • And it also includes people who have been put on part-time or casual work.
  • Students who have lost employment can also apply.

The COVID-19 Pandemic Unemployment Payment is paid at a flat rate of €203 per week for 6 weeks. It is equivalent to the jobseeker payment rate.

If you are getting another social welfare payment and you have lost your employment, it can be paid in addition to this.

 

Employers – Keeping Staff & Refunds

Revenue has worked closely with Department of Employment Affairs and Social Protection (DEASP) to provide an option for employers to make this payment to their employees through the normal payroll process. The amounts paid to employees under the scheme are not subject to tax, USC or PRSI.

Employers are encouraged to facilitate employees by operating the scheme. The amounts paid to employees and notified to Revenue will then be transferred into the employer’s bank account by Revenue.

This reimbursement will, in general, be made on a ‘next day’ basis. It will ensure a speedy payment process for employees and minimise the hardship for employees who are temporarily laid off. Refunds of income tax or USC that an employee may be entitled to because of being laid off will also be administered by the employer and will be repaid (to the employer) through the scheme.

The scheme can be operated for all employees for whom a payroll submission was made by the employer in the period from 1 February 2020 to 15 March 2020. Where employees have already been laid off and their employer has ceased their employment, they can apply directly to DEASP for the payment.

 

Who does the scheme apply to?

  • Employers who have temporarily laid off staff as a result of the impact on their business of the COVID-19 (Coronavirus) pandemic
  • Employers that keep their staff on payroll and have not ceased the employee(s) with Revenue
  • Employees for whom a payroll submission was made by the employer in the period from 1 February 2020 to 15 March 2020
  • Employers that are unable to make top-up payments over and above the emergency payment of €203 per week.

Making an application for the Refund Scheme

Employers, or their agents, apply to Revenue to operate the scheme by carrying out the following steps:

Log on to ROS myEnquiries and select the category Employer COVID -19 Refund Scheme’.

Read the declaration and press the ‘Submit’ button.

Log on to ROS and in ‘Manage bank accounts’, ‘Manage EFT’, ensure that the bank account details provided are correct.

 

Key features of the scheme

The employer will make the payroll submission to Revenue on or before each pay date.

Employers should contact their payroll software providers for assistance in respect of payroll to be processed under this scheme.

The employer runs the payroll as normal, entering the following details for each relevant employee:

 

PRSI Class set to J9

A pay amount of €0.01 (there must be some pay entered for the payroll to run).

A non-taxable amount of €203. No other payment amounts are made by the employer to the employee and all temporarily laid off employees are granted the €203.

The payroll submission must include pay frequency and period number.

No other payments are made by the employer to the employee for the applicable week(s) and all temporarily laid off employees receive the €203 per week.

Income tax, USC and PRSI are not deducted from the €203 payment.

Any Income Tax and USC refunds that arise as a result of the application of tax credits and rate bands can be repaid by the employer and this amount will also be refunded to the employer.

The employee must confirm to the employer that they have not, and will not, claim a payment from DEASP whilst the employer makes this payment through the payroll.

Employers will be asked to advise employees to make a Jobseeker’s Benefit claim via the MyWelfare.ie online portal (so that the employee(s) can access qualified dependant payments if appropriate).

Based on the information provided in payroll submissions, Revenue will credit €203 per employee per week to the employer’s bank account recorded in ROS.  The credit will include the reference COVID Employer Refund. (The main identifiers include Employer Number Gross Pay of €0.01, J9 PRSI class, Pay Frequency and Employee PPSN, Employment ID).

Revenue will credit the employer bank account for payroll submissions received before 2:00 PM each day.  Depending on the individual bank, the refund should be with the employer on the next banking day.

If the employee(s) resume employment with the employer, or obtains other supports from DEASP, or secures employment elsewhere, the employer will not include the employee(s) concerned in future submissions.

 

Guidance/Information

For general issues relating to the Scheme, employers should contact Revenue’s National Employer Helpdesk via the myEnquiries system, providing details of the query and a direct dial contact number.

Employers should make sure to select ‘Employer’s PAYE’ and then ‘Employer’s PAYE General Enquiry’ when submitting the query through myEnquiries.

 

Lay off procedures

Do I need to pay employees sick pay?

If an employee presents a medical certificate for any reason, including contraction of the virus or self-isolation, you should follow your sick pay policy as normal.

If an employee contracts Coronavirus (COVD-19) or is medically instructed to self-isolate, they will be entitled to received €305 per week from the Department of Social Protection. This payment is up to 2 weeks for self-isolation and for the duration of the illness if contracted.

Can I place employees on a period of lay-off?

A ‘lay-off’ situation can occur when there is an unexpected downturn in the business that is out of the Company’s control. If you have no work for the employee, and/or the Business is under extreme financial pressure, you can place an employee on lay-off.

Lay-off is viewed as being a temporary situation, so employers should be aware that if lay-off lasts for a certain length of time, the employee may be entitled to seek a redundancy payment.

If you are considering placing an employee on lay-off, you need to ensure you have a business justification for doing so. If your decision was ever challenged in the WRC, you will need to show your reasoning.

Can I put some staff on lay off while others work?

In relation to choosing employees for the reduction/short time, the criteria should be reasonable and applied in a fair manner. The last in, first out is deemed as appropriate, or by department based on the tasks that they are completing.

What is the process for placing employees on lay-off?

You must have a lay off clause in the employees’ contract of employment.

Lay Off

You as the employer would need to inform your employees that you are placing them on lay off and issue them with the relevant notification (Form RP9) confirming this.

Employees are not paid during a period of lay off, they can claim Social Welfare during this period. If an employee is on lay off from a business for a period of four weeks, they can request to be made redundant, if they have in excess of 2 years’ service. If this happens, there will be a cost involved for the company.

Short Time

When employees are placed on short time this requires that they be reduced to 50% or less of their normal working hours. When on short time employees may apply for Social Welfare to make up the rest of the week. It is important that the hours do not go above 50% while the period of short time continues.

 

With regards to redundancy claims under both of these systems;

Lay-off and short-time are viewed as being temporary situations, so  you as the employer should be aware that if either the lay-off or short-time working lasts for a certain length of time, the employee may be entitled to seek a redundancy payment.

This occurs when the employee has been laid off or kept on short-time (or a combination of both) for either

  • At least four consecutive weeks or,
  • within a 13-week period, for a series of at least six weeks of which not more than three were consecutive

Within 4 weeks of either of the above situations ceasing, the employee can decide to claim redundancy. The claim must be made on the form RP9. Once the employer receives this form s/he has two options:

  • S/he can accept it and pay the redundancy lump sum thereby accepting that there is a termination of employment; or
  • S/he can give a counter notice within seven days to the employee contesting their claim for redundancy.

Counter Notice

By issuing a counter notice the employer promises that within four weeks the employee will be employed for a period of 13 consecutive weeks.

If this does not happen, the counter notice is invalid and the employee is entitled to a redundancy payment. The employee is entitled to statutory redundancy only. S/he is not entitled to a notice payment, as s/he is the party terminating the employment.

Form RP9 – Lay-off and short time procedures

Banking supports

Micro Finance Ireland

If your business is impacted or may be impacted by COVID-19 resulting in a reduction of 15% or more in actual or projected turnover or profit, AND you are having difficulty in accessing  finance from commercial lending providers, the MFI COVID-19 Business Loan may be able to help your business.

In addition, Local Enterprise Offices in every county provide a range of business supports for micro- enterprises including business continuity and preparedness advisory supports connected to the  COVID-19 outbreak. Contact your Local Enterprise Office for more information.

Eligibility

  • Any business (Sole Trader, Partnership or Limited Company) with less than 10 employees and annual turnover of up to €2m
  • Not in a position to avail of finance from Banks and other commercial lending providers
  • 15% of actual or projected turnover or profit is negatively impacted by COVID-19

Product Features

  • Loans from €5,000 – €50,000
  • Supports businesses who have been impacted negatively by coronavirus in Ireland
  • Loan terms typically up to 3 years
  • Up to 6 months Interest only payments
  • No fees/no hidden costs/charges
  • Fixed repayments/no penalty for early repayment

Application process

Application documentation can be found at this web addresshttps://microfinanceireland.ie/loan-packages/covid19/

  • Complete application form
  • Prepare monthly cash flow forecast for 12 months
  • Complete Micro Finance Ireland Business Plan
  • Submit six months bank statements and in the case of a Limited company six months bank statements for Directors and Shareholders holding 25% or more of the issued share capital of the company.
  • For Limited company applicants only – A central Credit Register report for each Director and for any Shareholders holding 25% or more of the issued share capital of the company.

Strategic Banking Corporation of Ireland

The Department of Business, Enterprise and Innovation announced a number of supports for businesses facing challenges being presented by the current Covid-19 situation. The Credit Guarantee Scheme is in place and available now to SMEs subject to the relevant terms and conditions. Separately the SBCI is currently working to finalise the terms and conditions of the SBCI COVID19 Working Capital Scheme and the eligibility application process for this. The SBCI website will be updated as soon as these are finalised. In the interim if you wish to be kept informed on developments please email the SBCI at info@sbci.gov.ie

SME Credit Guarantee Scheme (CGS) 

The Scheme aims to assist viable SMEs, which under normal lending criteria are unable to borrow from their bank, in accessing credit. The scheme operates by providing an 80% guarantee to participating finance providers (currently AIB, Bank of Ireland and Ulster Bank) on qualifying loans to SMEs.

The Scheme is operated on behalf of the Department of Business, Enterprise and Innovation (D/BEI) by the Strategic Banking Corporation of Ireland (SBCI) and is available from the participating banks (AIB, Bank of Ireland and Ulster Bank). If you are an SME,  you can approach any one of the participating banks and apply for a loan facility under CGS.

Key Features of the Scheme:

  • Facilities of €10,000 up to €1m
  • Terms of up to 7 years
  • Term Loans, Demand Loans and Performance Bonds

 

Who is eligible for the Scheme? 

SMEs may be eligible if they:

  • Are involved in a commercial activity
  • Are a sole trader, partnership, franchise, co-operative or limited company
  • In the lender’s opinion have a viable business proposal
  • Are able to repay the facility

 

How to apply do for the scheme

The scheme is available through participating lenders AIB, Bank of Ireland and Ulster Bank at the web addresses below:

AIB : https://business.aib.ie/products/finance-and-loans/credit-guarantee-scheme

BOI : https://businessbanking.bankofireland.com/credit/credit-guarantee-scheme/

Ulster Bank : https://digital.ulsterbank.ie/business/loans-and-finance/alternative-financing.html

 

Allied Irish Bank (AIB)

AIB’s Covid 19 supports are available at this web address – https://aib.ie/covid19

The financial supports include the following

Cashflow products available to customers and web address for applications

Business Credit Linehttps://business.aib.ie/products/finance-and-loans/business-credit-line?_ga=2.155766331.160936585.1584353997-1581556376.1584353997

Farmer Credit Linehttps://business.aib.ie/products/finance-and-loans/business-credit-line?_ga=2.155766331.160936585.1584353997-1581556376.1584353997

Promptpay – https://business.aib.ie/products/finance-and-loans/promptpay-and-insurance-premium-finance?_ga=2.146517556.160936585.1584353997-1581556376.1584353997

Business loans of between €2,000 and €60,000 can be applied for on line at this web address : https://business.aib.ie/products/finance-and-loans/business-loans?_ga=2.185208617.160936585.1584353997-1581556376.1584353997

Customer in Difficulty (Forbearance Requests)

AIB have a number of possible solutions available depending on your circumstances

  • Capital Moratorium
  • Capital and Interest Moratorium
  • Covenant Waivers

AIB Advisors are available in branch or on the phone 1890 478 833

 

Bank of Ireland

The supports offered by Bank of Ireland are as follows:

  • Emergency working capital, prioritising loan decisions for impacted customers, payment flexibility on loan facilities, and the provision of trade finance and foreign currency products to support sourcing products from new suppliers internationally.
  • Customers who are concerned about the impact of COVID-19 on their business are encouraged to make contact with their Business Relationship Manager or ring 0818 200 348.
  • Bank of Ireland sectoral experts – in agriculture, manufacturing, hospitality, health, food and beverage, and retail convenience – are also available to support customers.

A full listing of supports from BOI are at this web address: https://businessbanking.bankofireland.com/covid-19/supports-for-businesses/

 

Ulster Bank

Ulster Bank have introduced a financial assessment that is designed to evaluate your financial situation and to offer support where you need it most.

Specially trained staff will carry out a financial review. They will review your current financial situation and take you through the repayment options available. These options include:

  • Extending loan terms
  • Temporarily moving to interest only payments
  • Reduced payments on a temporary basis
  • Postponement of monthly repayments for a defined period of time

A full listing of supports from Ulster Bank are at this web address: https://digital.ulsterbank.ie/personal/help-and-support/struggling-financially.html